Not Yr Sick Girl — A Polemical Disability Reading of Kan Gao’s To The Moon

—— By Addie Barron —— The Sick Woman is all of the “dysfunctional,” “dangerous” and “in danger,” “badly behaved,” “crazy,” “incurable,” “traumatized,” “disordered,” “diseased,” “chronic,” “uninsurable,” “wretched,” “undesirable” and altogether “dysfunctional” bodies belonging to women, people of color, poor, ill, neuro-atypical, differently abled, queer, trans, and genderfluid people, who have been historically pathologized, hospitalized, institutionalized, … Continue reading Not Yr Sick Girl — A Polemical Disability Reading of Kan Gao’s To The Moon

Subtlety in Mainichi

Mainichi was extremely subtle and allowed me, as the player, to gain some insight into what it is like to live as a trans-woman. Compared to Dys4ia, I felt like Mainichi was much more subtle, and through that subtleness, I was able to better understand the micro-aggressions towards trans-individuals. Aesthetically, Mainichi was very reminiscent of … Continue reading Subtlety in Mainichi

Dys4ia’s narrative vs game mechanics

Dys4ia’s levels often presented words/phrases that described the internal and external state of the transgender protagonist that implied the game mechanics instead of providing the actual instructions. One of the reasons the game felt different to me was the fact that its series of mini-game stages lasted only 4-5 seconds. Because of this extraordinary pace, … Continue reading Dys4ia’s narrative vs game mechanics